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iheartmyart:

See more on:
♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
See more gifs on iheartmyart.

iheartmyart:

See more on:

♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list pinterest  

See more gifs on iheartmyart.

(Source: boobly)

fuckyeahdementia:

"if they don’t ever open the box to feed it, it’ll eventually just be two different kinds of dead."

fuckyeahdementia:

"if they don’t ever open the box to feed it, it’ll eventually just be two different kinds of dead."

skunkbear:

3D Fractals

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

(via npr)

ooblium:

A Friend’s Reunion by Max Ernst
Oil on canvas

ooblium:

A Friend’s Reunion by Max Ernst

Oil on canvas

muspeccoll:

Manuscript Monday: It’s the first day of school here at Mizzou, so we’re celebrating with one of our favorite manuscripts.  This is a manuscript copy of Ovid’s Metamorphoses produced in Italy around the middle of the sixteenth century.  It’s massive - with over 600 leaves - and was written on paper. The first 24 leaves include an Italian translation between the lines, and you can see that the copyist left ample room for it to continue through the rest of the manuscript.  No one ever finished it, however.

Each of the books has a delicate pen-and-ink drawing, and we’ll share a few others throughout the semester.  These drawings appear to be related to the work of Giacomo Franco, a contemporary engraver. 

P. Ovidii Nasonis Metamorphoseon. manuscript, [ca. 1550?] MERLIN catalog record or more information at the Digital Scriptorium

One of the strongest motives that lead men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one’s own ever-shifting desires. A finely tempered nature longs to escape from the personal life into the world of objective perception and thought.
– Albert Einstein (via utcjonesobservatory)

(via infinity-imagined)

drawingarchitecture:

Dan Liu, Capriccio of Coal Exchange. 

drawingarchitecture:

Dan Liu, Capriccio of Coal Exchange. 

houghtonlib:

Cartari, Vincenzo, approximately 1500- Le imagini de i dei de gli antichi nelle qvali si contengono gl’idoli, riti, ceremonie, & altre cose appartenenti alla religione de gli antichi, 1571.
Typ 525.71.260
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Cartari, Vincenzo, approximately 1500- Le imagini de i dei de gli antichi nelle qvali si contengono gl’idoli, riti, ceremonie, & altre cose appartenenti alla religione de gli antichi, 1571.

Typ 525.71.260

Houghton Library, Harvard University

antique-anatomy:

Fortunio Liceti (Latin: Fortunius Licetus; October 3, 1577 – May 17, 1657), was an Italian doctor, philosopher, and scientist.

He was born prematurely at Rapallo, near Genoa to Giuseppe Liceti and Maria Fini, while the family was moving from Recco. His father was a doctor and created a makeshift incubator, thereby saving Fortunio.

Fortunio studied with his father from 1595 until 1599, when he moved on to the University of Bologna, where he studied philosophy and medicine. There his teachers included Giovanni Costeo and Federico Pendasio, two men whom Liceti respected so much he later named his first son in their honor (Giovanni Federico Liceti). In October of 1599, Giuseppe Liceti fell fatally ill and Fortunio returned to Genoa, where Giuseppe was now practicing medicine. On March 23, 1600, Liceti received his doctorate in philosophy and medicine.

On November 5 of that year, Liceti took a position as lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and in 1605, he was awarded a chair in philosophy. On August 25, 1609, he was given a professorship in philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was elected to the Accademia del Ricovrati in 1619 and held several offices within the group. He was denied promotion when senior colleagues died in both 1631 and 1637, so Liceti moved to the University of Bologna from 1637 to 1645, where he taught philosophy. On September 28, 1645, the University of Padua invited him to return as the first professor of theoretical medicine, the most prestigious chair in medicine, and he accepted. He held this position until his death. Throughout his life, Liceti remained committed philosophically to an Aristotelian viewpoint, although some recent scholars, such as Giuseppe Ongaro, have suggested he was not a rigid dogmatist.

Liceti died on May 17, 1657 and was buried in the church of Sant’Agostino in Padua. The church was later demolished but his grave marker, inscribed with an epitaph composed by Liceti himself, was saved and is now housed in the city’s Civic Museum.

antique-anatomy:

Fortunio Liceti (Latin: Fortunius Licetus; October 3, 1577 – May 17, 1657), was an Italian doctor, philosopher, and scientist.

He was born prematurely at Rapallo, near Genoa to Giuseppe Liceti and Maria Fini, while the family was moving from Recco. His father was a doctor and created a makeshift incubator, thereby saving Fortunio.

Fortunio studied with his father from 1595 until 1599, when he moved on to the University of Bologna, where he studied philosophy and medicine. There his teachers included Giovanni Costeo and Federico Pendasio, two men whom Liceti respected so much he later named his first son in their honor (Giovanni Federico Liceti). In October of 1599, Giuseppe Liceti fell fatally ill and Fortunio returned to Genoa, where Giuseppe was now practicing medicine. On March 23, 1600, Liceti received his doctorate in philosophy and medicine.

On November 5 of that year, Liceti took a position as lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and in 1605, he was awarded a chair in philosophy. On August 25, 1609, he was given a professorship in philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was elected to the Accademia del Ricovrati in 1619 and held several offices within the group. He was denied promotion when senior colleagues died in both 1631 and 1637, so Liceti moved to the University of Bologna from 1637 to 1645, where he taught philosophy. On September 28, 1645, the University of Padua invited him to return as the first professor of theoretical medicine, the most prestigious chair in medicine, and he accepted. He held this position until his death. Throughout his life, Liceti remained committed philosophically to an Aristotelian viewpoint, although some recent scholars, such as Giuseppe Ongaro, have suggested he was not a rigid dogmatist.

Liceti died on May 17, 1657 and was buried in the church of Sant’Agostino in Padua. The church was later demolished but his grave marker, inscribed with an epitaph composed by Liceti himself, was saved and is now housed in the city’s Civic Museum.

surrealism:

Tyrolean Dreams by Sir John Selby-Bigge, 1935. Oil on board, 41 x 30.5 cm.

surrealism:

Tyrolean Dreams by Sir John Selby-Bigge, 1935. Oil on board, 41 x 30.5 cm.

houghtonlib:

Lear, Edward, 1812-1888. Drawing of a chimpanzee, 1830s.
MS Typ 55.12
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Lear, Edward, 1812-1888. Drawing of a chimpanzee, 1830s.

MS Typ 55.12

Houghton Library, Harvard University

iheartmyart:

See more on:
♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
See more gifs on iheartmyart.

iheartmyart:

See more on:

♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list pinterest  

See more gifs on iheartmyart.

(Source: boobly)

fuckyeahdementia:

"if they don’t ever open the box to feed it, it’ll eventually just be two different kinds of dead."

fuckyeahdementia:

"if they don’t ever open the box to feed it, it’ll eventually just be two different kinds of dead."

skunkbear:

3D Fractals

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

(via npr)

ooblium:

A Friend’s Reunion by Max Ernst
Oil on canvas

ooblium:

A Friend’s Reunion by Max Ernst

Oil on canvas

muspeccoll:

Manuscript Monday: It’s the first day of school here at Mizzou, so we’re celebrating with one of our favorite manuscripts.  This is a manuscript copy of Ovid’s Metamorphoses produced in Italy around the middle of the sixteenth century.  It’s massive - with over 600 leaves - and was written on paper. The first 24 leaves include an Italian translation between the lines, and you can see that the copyist left ample room for it to continue through the rest of the manuscript.  No one ever finished it, however.

Each of the books has a delicate pen-and-ink drawing, and we’ll share a few others throughout the semester.  These drawings appear to be related to the work of Giacomo Franco, a contemporary engraver. 

P. Ovidii Nasonis Metamorphoseon. manuscript, [ca. 1550?] MERLIN catalog record or more information at the Digital Scriptorium

One of the strongest motives that lead men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one’s own ever-shifting desires. A finely tempered nature longs to escape from the personal life into the world of objective perception and thought.
– Albert Einstein (via utcjonesobservatory)

(via infinity-imagined)

(Source: fiorenn, via infinity-imagined)

spaceexp:

Saturn’s moon Rhea taken by Cassini

spaceexp:

Saturn’s moon Rhea taken by Cassini

(via infinity-imagined)

drawingarchitecture:

Dan Liu, Capriccio of Coal Exchange. 

drawingarchitecture:

Dan Liu, Capriccio of Coal Exchange. 

houghtonlib:

Cartari, Vincenzo, approximately 1500- Le imagini de i dei de gli antichi nelle qvali si contengono gl’idoli, riti, ceremonie, & altre cose appartenenti alla religione de gli antichi, 1571.
Typ 525.71.260
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Cartari, Vincenzo, approximately 1500- Le imagini de i dei de gli antichi nelle qvali si contengono gl’idoli, riti, ceremonie, & altre cose appartenenti alla religione de gli antichi, 1571.

Typ 525.71.260

Houghton Library, Harvard University

antique-anatomy:

Fortunio Liceti (Latin: Fortunius Licetus; October 3, 1577 – May 17, 1657), was an Italian doctor, philosopher, and scientist.

He was born prematurely at Rapallo, near Genoa to Giuseppe Liceti and Maria Fini, while the family was moving from Recco. His father was a doctor and created a makeshift incubator, thereby saving Fortunio.

Fortunio studied with his father from 1595 until 1599, when he moved on to the University of Bologna, where he studied philosophy and medicine. There his teachers included Giovanni Costeo and Federico Pendasio, two men whom Liceti respected so much he later named his first son in their honor (Giovanni Federico Liceti). In October of 1599, Giuseppe Liceti fell fatally ill and Fortunio returned to Genoa, where Giuseppe was now practicing medicine. On March 23, 1600, Liceti received his doctorate in philosophy and medicine.

On November 5 of that year, Liceti took a position as lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and in 1605, he was awarded a chair in philosophy. On August 25, 1609, he was given a professorship in philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was elected to the Accademia del Ricovrati in 1619 and held several offices within the group. He was denied promotion when senior colleagues died in both 1631 and 1637, so Liceti moved to the University of Bologna from 1637 to 1645, where he taught philosophy. On September 28, 1645, the University of Padua invited him to return as the first professor of theoretical medicine, the most prestigious chair in medicine, and he accepted. He held this position until his death. Throughout his life, Liceti remained committed philosophically to an Aristotelian viewpoint, although some recent scholars, such as Giuseppe Ongaro, have suggested he was not a rigid dogmatist.

Liceti died on May 17, 1657 and was buried in the church of Sant’Agostino in Padua. The church was later demolished but his grave marker, inscribed with an epitaph composed by Liceti himself, was saved and is now housed in the city’s Civic Museum.

antique-anatomy:

Fortunio Liceti (Latin: Fortunius Licetus; October 3, 1577 – May 17, 1657), was an Italian doctor, philosopher, and scientist.

He was born prematurely at Rapallo, near Genoa to Giuseppe Liceti and Maria Fini, while the family was moving from Recco. His father was a doctor and created a makeshift incubator, thereby saving Fortunio.

Fortunio studied with his father from 1595 until 1599, when he moved on to the University of Bologna, where he studied philosophy and medicine. There his teachers included Giovanni Costeo and Federico Pendasio, two men whom Liceti respected so much he later named his first son in their honor (Giovanni Federico Liceti). In October of 1599, Giuseppe Liceti fell fatally ill and Fortunio returned to Genoa, where Giuseppe was now practicing medicine. On March 23, 1600, Liceti received his doctorate in philosophy and medicine.

On November 5 of that year, Liceti took a position as lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and in 1605, he was awarded a chair in philosophy. On August 25, 1609, he was given a professorship in philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was elected to the Accademia del Ricovrati in 1619 and held several offices within the group. He was denied promotion when senior colleagues died in both 1631 and 1637, so Liceti moved to the University of Bologna from 1637 to 1645, where he taught philosophy. On September 28, 1645, the University of Padua invited him to return as the first professor of theoretical medicine, the most prestigious chair in medicine, and he accepted. He held this position until his death. Throughout his life, Liceti remained committed philosophically to an Aristotelian viewpoint, although some recent scholars, such as Giuseppe Ongaro, have suggested he was not a rigid dogmatist.

Liceti died on May 17, 1657 and was buried in the church of Sant’Agostino in Padua. The church was later demolished but his grave marker, inscribed with an epitaph composed by Liceti himself, was saved and is now housed in the city’s Civic Museum.

surrealism:

Tyrolean Dreams by Sir John Selby-Bigge, 1935. Oil on board, 41 x 30.5 cm.

surrealism:

Tyrolean Dreams by Sir John Selby-Bigge, 1935. Oil on board, 41 x 30.5 cm.

houghtonlib:

Lear, Edward, 1812-1888. Drawing of a chimpanzee, 1830s.
MS Typ 55.12
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Lear, Edward, 1812-1888. Drawing of a chimpanzee, 1830s.

MS Typ 55.12

Houghton Library, Harvard University

"One of the strongest motives that lead men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one’s own ever-shifting desires. A finely tempered nature longs to escape from the personal life into the world of objective perception and thought."

About:

Memory at the molecular level
Art,
Bicycles,
Movies,
Insanity,
etc....

Following:

NPR
Oh.